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July 2020 Update | We are now back to our regular winter trading hours of 10am to 3pm – seven days a week. We are continuing to maintain the appropriate operating procedures in the nursery to comply with current distancing and hygiene regulations.

PHONE ORDERING / DELIVERY | To order plants or gardening products for delivery (between Dalmeny and Bermagui) ring us on 44 737 196 between 10am and 3pm to pay by credit card. Your order will then be put together and scheduled for delivery. Ring us for more details. Keith.

  IN THE NURSERY | Perennial colour in the nursery this winter! | MORE

  NATIVE COLOUR | Winter Flowering Natives | MORE

JULY HOURS | 10am to 3pm – seven days a week. Keith.

IN THE NURSERY | MORE

The nursery stocks a unique range of quality plants for all gardens. Each season sees a new range of colours and inspirations in the nursery and Keith ans Desiree posess the horticultural expertise to make sure the right plant finds the right place in the right garden. Tilba Nursery is particularly renowned for its range of cottage and perennial plants – including many rare and seldom grown varieties. This range of quality of plants, sourced from the best specialist growers, sees cottage garden enthusiasts from all parts of NSW (and even interstate) regularly visiting to track down plants simply not available anywhere else.

We currently have several Prunus mume weeping stan We currently have several Prunus mume weeping standards in stock - and these are already starting to display their delicate pink flowers in the nursery. Keith #inthenursery #blossom
Bracteantha 'Mohave' - hardy native perennial with Bracteantha 'Mohave' - hardy native perennial with bright orange fliowers. Back in stock this week. Keith #inthenursey #nativeplants #flowers
Conostylis candicans features features cheery yell Conostylis candicans features features cheery yellow flowers and soft blue/grey foliage from autumn through to the end of spring. They make a spectacular soft border or massed display when planted in numbers. Keith. #inthenursery #conostylis #ozplants #australianplants #nativeplants
Dianthus ‘Sugar Plum Coral’ - raspberry sorbet Dianthus ‘Sugar Plum Coral’ - raspberry sorbet coloured flowers combine with blue/grey foliage to create a stunning garden or container plant. Flowers are scented. Keith. #perennials #dianthus #scentedflowers #inthenursery
Kangaroo Paws are a great native option for winter Kangaroo Paws are a great native option for winter / spring colour in the garden. We have a big range of Paws (and Conostylis) in stock this weekend. Keith. #inthenursery #nativeplants #kangaroooaws #winterflower
Nyssa sylvatica - Tupelo - features ornamental bar Nyssa sylvatica - Tupelo - features ornamental bark and deep green foliage that turns yellow to scarlet in autumn. We now new semi-advanced stock of the faster growing Nyssa sylvatica NXSXF Forum in stock. Keith. #trees #inthenursey #tupelo #nyssa
Grevillea lanigera ‘Mt Tamboritha” - hardy gro Grevillea lanigera ‘Mt Tamboritha” - hardy ground cover Grevillea with masses of flowers from autumn into winter. Just one of the winter flowering natives in stock this weekend. Keith. #nativeplants #grevilleas #inthenursey #winterflower
Kangaroo Paws are a great native option for winter Kangaroo Paws are a great native option for winter / spring colour in the garden. We have a big range of Paws (and Conostylis) in stock this weekend. Keith. #inthenursery #nativeplants #kangaroooaws #winterflower
Eremophila nivea - beautiful soft, silver foliage Eremophila nivea - beautiful soft, silver foliage make this a striking contrast plant in any garden. Also features maybe flowers. We currently have grafted plants in stock. Keith. #inthenursery #nativeplants #eremophila #foliage #silver - image by @thesilverdory

Apart from cottage plants and perennials the nursery also carries an extensive range of Australian natives (many unusual or rare), cacti and succulents, citrus, berries and unusual food plants, roses (old fashioned, modern and species), rare and interesting exotics – plus seedlings and herbs. We now also carry a range of indoor plants in the shop | more

NOTE | for more information and images of new stock in the nursery see our In the Nursery page or follow us on Instagram / Facebook for daily updates.

TILBA NURSERY NEWS

FACEBOOK | For all the latest Tilba Nursery news and updates on plants in the nursery, promotions and Thursday Talks follow us on Facebook here

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Were got a great range of fruit trees and berries in the nursery this weekend with our first delivery of Big Sweetie strawberries for the year arriving during the week. Deciduous fruit trees in stock include figs (white and brown), peaches, plums, pears and a range of dwarf and regular apples (all robust potted plants). We also have blueberries, raspberries and large range of citrus in stock. Drop in for a browse if youre down Tilba Tilba way - were open 10am to 3pm Sat + Sun. Keith #news #fruit #winter

Friday July 3rd

We're got a great range of fruit trees and berries in the nursery this weekend with our first delivery of 'Big Sweetie' strawberries for the year arriving during the week. Deciduous fruit trees in stock include figs (white and brown), peaches, plums, pears and a range of dwarf and regular apples (all robust potted plants). We also have blueberries, raspberries and large range of citrus in stock. Drop in for a browse if you're down Tilba Tilba way - we're open 10am to 3pm Sat + Sun. Keith #news #fruit #winter ... See MoreSee Less

No Thursday Talk again this month but here are a few handy tips for selecting new trees for your garden this winter - from my Gardening Gabble column in the Triangle Community News (July 2020). Keith.

Natures Air Purifiers

With the recent devastating fires in our area many beautiful gardens were destroyed and along with that, the loss of beautifully established shade trees, the natural umbrellas of our gardens.It is important in the re-establishment of our gardens that we consider the replacement of these essential components of the landscape, and during these winter months many of these trees are available in nurseries.

In making your selection, consideration into the eventual size of the tree must be utmost in your mind. What do you want the tree to provide – summer shade for a particular section of your garden, winter sun or any other reason you might think important. Once the tree has been planted and has started to establish it can detrimental to the tree if you must dig it up and relocate to another location.

There are many trees that can be selected from including : large spreading forms, upright narrow trees for a restricted part of the garden, weeping trees for a central garden position or a range of flowering trees that add a beautiful touch to any spring garden.

Larger spreading trees include Golden Ash, Claret Ash, Manchurian Pear, Gleditsia (several forms) Robinia and Chinese Elm. Upright forms include ornamental Pears (several varieties), ornamental plums (new narrow forms) and many other new varieties that have recently come onto the market. Flowering trees include ornamental Cherries, Crab apples, plums and some magnificent Magnolias.

Most nurseries will now have many of their deciduous trees in stock and, depending on the nursery, the owner would have selected either bare root or container grown forms. With the selection of a bare root tree it is important to ensure that at no stage have the roots been allowed to dry out, as this can cause the tree some difficulty in establishing after it has been planted. Pot grown trees have a more established root system and can be a bit more mature in size and will not have had their roots dry out.

Once your selection has been made the next most important procedure is the planting. If you have selected the bare root form, dig a hole slightly larger than the root size and at least deep enough to cover the roots and no higher than halfway to the graft union. Soak the roots in water and a liquid seaweed base fertiliser and mix some composted animal manure with the soil you have dug out of the hole. Place the tree in at the correct depth and gradually add the soil back into the hole slightly shaking the tree as you go, to allow the soil to fall in amongst the roots. When you have all the soil in the hole slightly compress the soil and water in, to remove any air pockets. Stake if required using two stakes at the side of the plant taking care not to damage the roots.

If you have purchased container grown plants the planting process is the same apart from slightly loosening the roots to allow them to establish. If you are unsure of any of these processes, ask you nursery person.

I previously mentioned in an earlier column that it was important to be patient when making the decision to remove fire affected trees as, depending on the severity of the fires, they might not have been killed but just scorched. I suppose spring will tell as if they don’t shoot, it is obvious they have died. If they are still standing there is hope. If you can reach branches, slightly scrape the bark in a small section and if it is still green, there is still a chance they will recover. If not, remove and start the replacement program.

Good luck!

Keith

#news #winter

Friday July 3rd

No Thursday Talk again this month but here are a few handy tips for selecting new trees for your garden this winter - from my 'Gardening Gabble' column in the Triangle Community News (July 2020). Keith.

Nature's Air Purifiers

With the recent devastating fires in our area many beautiful gardens were destroyed and along with that, the loss of beautifully established shade trees, the natural umbrellas of our gardens.It is important in the re-establishment of our gardens that we consider the replacement of these essential components of the landscape, and during these winter months many of these trees are available in nurseries.

In making your selection, consideration into the eventual size of the tree must be utmost in your mind. What do you want the tree to provide – summer shade for a particular section of your garden, winter sun or any other reason you might think important. Once the tree has been planted and has started to establish it can detrimental to the tree if you must dig it up and relocate to another location.

There are many trees that can be selected from including : large spreading forms, upright narrow trees for a restricted part of the garden, weeping trees for a central garden position or a range of flowering trees that add a beautiful touch to any spring garden.

Larger spreading trees include Golden Ash, Claret Ash, Manchurian Pear, Gleditsia (several forms) Robinia and Chinese Elm. Upright forms include ornamental Pears (several varieties), ornamental plums (new narrow forms) and many other new varieties that have recently come onto the market. Flowering trees include ornamental Cherries, Crab apples, plums and some magnificent Magnolias.

Most nurseries will now have many of their deciduous trees in stock and, depending on the nursery, the owner would have selected either bare root or container grown forms. With the selection of a bare root tree it is important to ensure that at no stage have the roots been allowed to dry out, as this can cause the tree some difficulty in establishing after it has been planted. Pot grown trees have a more established root system and can be a bit more mature in size and will not have had their roots dry out.

Once your selection has been made the next most important procedure is the planting. If you have selected the bare root form, dig a hole slightly larger than the root size and at least deep enough to cover the roots and no higher than halfway to the graft union. Soak the roots in water and a liquid seaweed base fertiliser and mix some composted animal manure with the soil you have dug out of the hole. Place the tree in at the correct depth and gradually add the soil back into the hole slightly shaking the tree as you go, to allow the soil to fall in amongst the roots. When you have all the soil in the hole slightly compress the soil and water in, to remove any air pockets. Stake if required using two stakes at the side of the plant taking care not to damage the roots.

If you have purchased container grown plants the planting process is the same apart from slightly loosening the roots to allow them to establish. If you are unsure of any of these processes, ask you nursery person.

I previously mentioned in an earlier column that it was important to be patient when making the decision to remove fire affected trees as, depending on the severity of the fires, they might not have been killed but just scorched. I suppose spring will tell as if they don’t shoot, it is obvious they have died. If they are still standing there is hope. If you can reach branches, slightly scrape the bark in a small section and if it is still green, there is still a chance they will recover. If not, remove and start the replacement program.

Good luck!

Keith

#news #winter
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Comment on Facebook No Thursday Talk ...

Oops....Howies error. Hope the Winters be kind to you. H.

W

New native plants in the nursery this week include Pimelea rosea ‘Deep Dream’ - a compact shrub (1m x 1m) featuring light green foliage and masses of vibrant pink tubular flowers in spring. We also have new Acacias, Banksias, Conostylis, Grevilleas and Westringias in stock. Keith #nativeplants #news

Thursday July 2nd

New native plants in the nursery this week include Pimelea rosea ‘Deep Dream’ - a compact shrub (1m x 1m) featuring light green foliage and masses of vibrant pink tubular flowers in spring. We also have new Acacias, Banksias, Conostylis, Grevilleas and Westringias in stock. Keith #nativeplants #news ... See MoreSee Less

Lots of new citrus in stock this week - all regular, tall growing forms. Meyer, Eureka and Lemonade lemons, Valencia and Lanes Late Navel Oranges, Imperial and Daisy Mandarin plus Kaffir Limes. Drop in for a browse if youre after some fresh citrus for you garden or orchard this winter. Keith #news #winter #citrus

Monday June 29th

Lots of new citrus in stock this week - all regular, tall growing forms. Meyer, Eureka and Lemonade lemons, Valencia and Lanes Late Navel Oranges, Imperial and Daisy Mandarin plus Kaffir Limes. Drop in for a browse if you're after some fresh citrus for you garden or orchard this winter. Keith #news #winter #citrus ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook Lots of new citrus ...

Hi Deborah. We have two varieties in at the moment. Daisy and Imperial. Both have good cold tolerance with Daisy ripening quicker with low heat. Keith

Hi Keith, what mandarine/s do you recommend for Verona area?

Winter-flowering native plants are a great option for colour in the garden at the moment. We currently have a nice selection of these in stock including dwarf banksias, grafted grevilleas, eremophilas and flowering gums, croweas, correas, kangaroo paws and more!  We are currently open 10am - 3pm, 7 days a week in Tilba Tilba - so drop in for a browse if you are down our way over the weekend. Keith #news #winter #nativeplants

Friday June 26th

Winter-flowering native plants are a great option for colour in the garden at the moment. We currently have a nice selection of these in stock including dwarf banksias, grafted grevilleas, eremophilas and flowering gums, croweas, correas, kangaroo paws and more! We are currently open 10am - 3pm, 7 days a week in Tilba Tilba - so drop in for a browse if you are down our way over the weekend. Keith #news #winter #nativeplants ... See MoreSee Less

We have a range of new pots in the shop and nursery this weekend - including some magnificent large urns. Keith #news #intheshop

Saturday June 20th

We have a range of new pots in the shop and nursery this weekend - including some magnificent large urns. Keith #news #intheshop ... See MoreSee Less