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August 2020 Update | We are now back to our regular winter trading hours of 10am to 3pm – seven days a week. We are continuing to maintain the appropriate operating procedures in the nursery to comply with current distancing and hygiene regulations.

PHONE ORDERING / DELIVERY | To order plants or gardening products for delivery (between Dalmeny and Bermagui) ring us on 44 737 196 between 10am and 3pm to pay by credit card. Your order will then be put together and scheduled for delivery. Ring us for more details. Keith.

  IN THE NURSERY | Deciduous trees in blossom | MORE

  WINTER FLOWERING | Winter colour in the nursery | MORE

AUGUST HOURS | 10am to 3pm – seven days a week. Keith.

IN THE NURSERY | MORE

The nursery stocks a unique range of quality plants for all gardens. Each season sees a new range of colours and inspirations in the nursery and Keith ans Desiree posess the horticultural expertise to make sure the right plant finds the right place in the right garden. Tilba Nursery is particularly renowned for its range of cottage and perennial plants – including many rare and seldom grown varieties. This range of quality of plants, sourced from the best specialist growers, sees cottage garden enthusiasts from all parts of NSW (and even interstate) regularly visiting to track down plants simply not available anywhere else.

Magnolia x loebneri 'Leonard Messel' starting to f Magnolia x loebneri 'Leonard Messel' starting to flower in the nursery. A lot of our winter collection of deciduous magnolias have found new homes in gardens across the region in recent weeks as they have come into flower - but we still have a nice range available - including white, yellow and deeper red/purple flowering varieties. We also have some semi-advanced plants if you're looking to make an instant statement in the garden with one of these stunning feature plants. Keith. #magnolias #inthenursery
Magnolia ‘Cleopatra' starting to flower in the n Magnolia ‘Cleopatra' starting to flower in the nursery. This early flowering, dwarf deciduous Magnolia is prized for its attractive red-purple flowers that display an almost metallic sheen. Keith #inthenursery #magnolias
Grevillea 'Crackles' - compact shrub with soft, gr Grevillea 'Crackles' - compact shrub with soft, green foliage and clusters of yellow/orange flowers throughout winter and spring. Currently flowering in the nursery. Keith. #inthenursery #grevilleas #nativeplants #winter #winterflower
Salvia 'Mystic Spires' is an attractive compact sa Salvia 'Mystic Spires' is an attractive compact sage featuring long stems of dark blue flowers. New stock in the nursery (and flowering) this week. Keith. #inthenursery #perennials #salvia
Anigozanthos ‘Bush Tenacity’ - a compact kanga Anigozanthos ‘Bush Tenacity’ - a compact kangaroo paw hybrid that features a showy combination of red flower stems and bright yellow flowers. Currently flowering in the nursery. Keith. #nativeplants #inthenursey #kangaroopaws #winter #winterflowering
We currently have several Prunus mume weeping stan We currently have several Prunus mume weeping standards in stock - and these are already starting to display their delicate pink flowers in the nursery. Keith #inthenursery #blossom
Bracteantha 'Mohave' - hardy native perennial with Bracteantha 'Mohave' - hardy native perennial with bright orange fliowers. Back in stock this week. Keith #inthenursey #nativeplants #flowers
Conostylis candicans features features cheery yell Conostylis candicans features features cheery yellow flowers and soft blue/grey foliage from autumn through to the end of spring. They make a spectacular soft border or massed display when planted in numbers. Keith. #inthenursery #conostylis #ozplants #australianplants #nativeplants
Dianthus ‘Sugar Plum Coral’ - raspberry sorbet Dianthus ‘Sugar Plum Coral’ - raspberry sorbet coloured flowers combine with blue/grey foliage to create a stunning garden or container plant. Flowers are scented. Keith. #perennials #dianthus #scentedflowers #inthenursery
Kangaroo Paws are a great native option for winter Kangaroo Paws are a great native option for winter / spring colour in the garden. We have a big range of Paws (and Conostylis) in stock this weekend. Keith. #inthenursery #nativeplants #kangaroooaws #winterflower
Nyssa sylvatica - Tupelo - features ornamental bar Nyssa sylvatica - Tupelo - features ornamental bark and deep green foliage that turns yellow to scarlet in autumn. We now new semi-advanced stock of the faster growing Nyssa sylvatica NXSXF Forum in stock. Keith. #trees #inthenursey #tupelo #nyssa

Apart from cottage plants and perennials the nursery also carries an extensive range of Australian natives (many unusual or rare), cacti and succulents, citrus, berries and unusual food plants, roses (old fashioned, modern and species), rare and interesting exotics – plus seedlings and herbs. We now also carry a range of indoor plants in the shop | more

NOTE | for more information and images of new stock in the nursery see our In the Nursery page or follow us on Instagram / Facebook for daily updates.

TILBA NURSERY NEWS

FACEBOOK | For all the latest Tilba Nursery news and updates on plants in the nursery, promotions and Thursday Talks follow us on Facebook here

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
New pots arrived this week and are now in the nursery and shop. There are some great new designs and finishes in this batch - drop in for a look if youre down Tilba Tilba way this weekend. Were open 10am to 3pm Sat + Sun. Keith. #news #intheshop

Friday August 7th

New pots arrived this week and are now in the nursery and shop. There are some great new designs and finishes in this batch - drop in for a look if you're down Tilba Tilba way this weekend. We're open 10am to 3pm Sat + Sun. Keith. #news #intheshop ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook 227452784121880_1450957861771360

They look amazing

Keith did you get any succulents pot - Cheers Pat - Narooma

No Thursday Talk again this month but here are a few handy seasonal gardening tips with spring just around the corner.

The Last Throes of Winter (from my Gardening Gabble column in the Triangle Community News - August 2020)

Well here we are with winter nearly over and after some very much appreciated rain it feels like spring is just around the corner. New growth appears on deciduous plants, perennials wake after their enforced winter hibernation and bulbs pop up everywhere as new life begins.

For those who had the misfortune to have lost their gardens in the fires now is a great time to commence the restoration of your garden to take advantage of the warmer spring conditions ahead.

Pruning of deciduous fruit trees and roses should be close to being completed. Winter spraying must have been completed and if not just check that the buds are showing a slight colour and have not burst. If they have burst, then you have missed the boat and any spraying with a winter spray could burn the blossom, leading to less or no fruit set.

New growth on roses and fruit trees are a delicious target for aphids so keep an eye out for them. Spray with an organic insecticide and this will halt their progress.

The vegetable garden should be getting the finishing touches prior to planting. Initially the garden should be dug over to spade depth and a spreading of lime (500 gms per square meter) all over applied. Some well - rotted cow or poultry manure can be added and forked in. Bare rooted asparagus and rhubarb can still be planted along with bare rooted or pot grown strawberries.

When growing vegetables, it is important to practice crop rotation. By this I mean do not plant the vegetable in the same position as you had it last season. This applies particularly to tomatoes and potatoes as these two groups of plants are in the same family and any pest or disease lying dormant in the soil could cause problems with the new crop this season.
Another trick is to go for quick turnover vegetables that can be picked and replaced regularly like lettuce, Asian greens, beans and spring onions.

Plant taller vegetables like corn and tomatoes on the side of the garden that is less likely to shade the rest of the garden.
For more permanent kitchen crops like herbs it is important to remember that there are three main categories of herbs. There are moisture lovers like mints and coriander, the dry garden herbs like parsley, sage, rosemary and the thymes and the higher nutrient leafy forms like the perpetual lettuce, spinach and more of the leafy herbs.

This month will see the last chance to plant bare root fruit trees and roses and as I have said many times it is absolutely important you pay particular attention to the condition of the plants you are about to purchase. Poorly stored plants in retail situations can allow the root systems to dry out and if this has happened the chance of the plant failing to re shoot is very high. Money ill spent.

Look for plants that show no signs of the bark shrivelling or the roots very dry. If there is any indication of this, leave the plants alone. No matter what the discounted price might be, they will be a failure.

When planting these new plants ensure to prepare the soil well and water in.

Anyway, now you have all the information you had better get out and get on with it! 

Till next time, happy planting.

Keith.

From ‘The Triangle’ - August 2020

#news #winter

Thursday August 6th

No Thursday Talk again this month but here are a few handy seasonal gardening tips with spring just around the corner.

The Last Throes of Winter (from my 'Gardening Gabble' column in the Triangle Community News - August 2020)

Well here we are with winter nearly over and after some very much appreciated rain it feels like spring is just around the corner. New growth appears on deciduous plants, perennials wake after their enforced winter hibernation and bulbs pop up everywhere as new life begins.

For those who had the misfortune to have lost their gardens in the fires now is a great time to commence the restoration of your garden to take advantage of the warmer spring conditions ahead.

Pruning of deciduous fruit trees and roses should be close to being completed. Winter spraying must have been completed and if not just check that the buds are showing a slight colour and have not burst. If they have burst, then you have missed the boat and any spraying with a winter spray could burn the blossom, leading to less or no fruit set.

New growth on roses and fruit trees are a delicious target for aphids so keep an eye out for them. Spray with an organic insecticide and this will halt their progress.

The vegetable garden should be getting the finishing touches prior to planting. Initially the garden should be dug over to spade depth and a spreading of lime (500 gms per square meter) all over applied. Some well - rotted cow or poultry manure can be added and forked in. Bare rooted asparagus and rhubarb can still be planted along with bare rooted or pot grown strawberries.

When growing vegetables, it is important to practice crop rotation. By this I mean do not plant the vegetable in the same position as you had it last season. This applies particularly to tomatoes and potatoes as these two groups of plants are in the same family and any pest or disease lying dormant in the soil could cause problems with the new crop this season.
Another trick is to go for quick turnover vegetables that can be picked and replaced regularly like lettuce, Asian greens, beans and spring onions.

Plant taller vegetables like corn and tomatoes on the side of the garden that is less likely to shade the rest of the garden.
For more permanent kitchen crops like herbs it is important to remember that there are three main categories of herbs. There are moisture lovers like mints and coriander, the dry garden herbs like parsley, sage, rosemary and the thymes and the higher nutrient leafy forms like the perpetual lettuce, spinach and more of the leafy herbs.

This month will see the last chance to plant bare root fruit trees and roses and as I have said many times it is absolutely important you pay particular attention to the condition of the plants you are about to purchase. Poorly stored plants in retail situations can allow the root systems to dry out and if this has happened the chance of the plant failing to re shoot is very high. Money ill spent.

Look for plants that show no signs of the bark shrivelling or the roots very dry. If there is any indication of this, leave the plants alone. No matter what the discounted price might be, they will be a failure.

When planting these new plants ensure to prepare the soil well and water in.

Anyway, now you have all the information you had better get out and get on with it!

Till next time, happy planting.

Keith.

From ‘The Triangle’ - August 2020

#news #winter
... See MoreSee Less

Lots of fresh winter colour in the nursery this weekend including leucadendrons, weeping apricots, lavenders and kangaroo paws - plus a big range of deciduous shade and feature trees, magnolias, fruit trees and berries. Drop in for a look if youre down our way! Keith #news #winter

Friday July 10th

Lots of fresh winter colour in the nursery this weekend including leucadendrons, weeping apricots, lavenders and kangaroo paws - plus a big range of deciduous shade and feature trees, magnolias, fruit trees and berries. Drop in for a look if you're down our way! Keith #news #winterWinter colour at the Tilba Nursery in Tilba Tilba. The nursery is currently open 10am to 3pm, seven days a week - just a short drive from Narooma or Bermagui. Images by Silverdory Productions #winter #tilbatilba #beautifultilba ... See MoreSee Less

We have a great range of fruit trees and berries in the nursery this week with our first delivery of Big Sweetie strawberries for the year arriving last week. Deciduous fruit trees in stock include figs (white and brown), peaches, plums, pears (including Nashis) and a range of dwarf and regular apples (all robust potted plants). We also have blueberries, raspberries and large range of citrus in stock. Drop in for a browse if youre down Tilba Tilba way. Keith #news #fruit #winter

Friday July 3rd

We have a great range of fruit trees and berries in the nursery this week with our first delivery of 'Big Sweetie' strawberries for the year arriving last week. Deciduous fruit trees in stock include figs (white and brown), peaches, plums, pears (including Nashis) and a range of dwarf and regular apples (all robust potted plants). We also have blueberries, raspberries and large range of citrus in stock. Drop in for a browse if you're down Tilba Tilba way. Keith #news #fruit #winter ... See MoreSee Less

No Thursday Talk again this month but here are a few handy tips for selecting new trees for your garden this winter - from my Gardening Gabble column in the Triangle Community News (July 2020). Keith.

Natures Air Purifiers

With the recent devastating fires in our area many beautiful gardens were destroyed and along with that, the loss of beautifully established shade trees, the natural umbrellas of our gardens.It is important in the re-establishment of our gardens that we consider the replacement of these essential components of the landscape, and during these winter months many of these trees are available in nurseries.

In making your selection, consideration into the eventual size of the tree must be utmost in your mind. What do you want the tree to provide – summer shade for a particular section of your garden, winter sun or any other reason you might think important. Once the tree has been planted and has started to establish it can detrimental to the tree if you must dig it up and relocate to another location.

There are many trees that can be selected from including : large spreading forms, upright narrow trees for a restricted part of the garden, weeping trees for a central garden position or a range of flowering trees that add a beautiful touch to any spring garden.

Larger spreading trees include Golden Ash, Claret Ash, Manchurian Pear, Gleditsia (several forms) Robinia and Chinese Elm. Upright forms include ornamental Pears (several varieties), ornamental plums (new narrow forms) and many other new varieties that have recently come onto the market. Flowering trees include ornamental Cherries, Crab apples, plums and some magnificent Magnolias.

Most nurseries will now have many of their deciduous trees in stock and, depending on the nursery, the owner would have selected either bare root or container grown forms. With the selection of a bare root tree it is important to ensure that at no stage have the roots been allowed to dry out, as this can cause the tree some difficulty in establishing after it has been planted. Pot grown trees have a more established root system and can be a bit more mature in size and will not have had their roots dry out.

Once your selection has been made the next most important procedure is the planting. If you have selected the bare root form, dig a hole slightly larger than the root size and at least deep enough to cover the roots and no higher than halfway to the graft union. Soak the roots in water and a liquid seaweed base fertiliser and mix some composted animal manure with the soil you have dug out of the hole. Place the tree in at the correct depth and gradually add the soil back into the hole slightly shaking the tree as you go, to allow the soil to fall in amongst the roots. When you have all the soil in the hole slightly compress the soil and water in, to remove any air pockets. Stake if required using two stakes at the side of the plant taking care not to damage the roots.

If you have purchased container grown plants the planting process is the same apart from slightly loosening the roots to allow them to establish. If you are unsure of any of these processes, ask you nursery person.

I previously mentioned in an earlier column that it was important to be patient when making the decision to remove fire affected trees as, depending on the severity of the fires, they might not have been killed but just scorched. I suppose spring will tell as if they don’t shoot, it is obvious they have died. If they are still standing there is hope. If you can reach branches, slightly scrape the bark in a small section and if it is still green, there is still a chance they will recover. If not, remove and start the replacement program.

Good luck!

Keith

#news #winter

Friday July 3rd

No Thursday Talk again this month but here are a few handy tips for selecting new trees for your garden this winter - from my 'Gardening Gabble' column in the Triangle Community News (July 2020). Keith.

Nature's Air Purifiers

With the recent devastating fires in our area many beautiful gardens were destroyed and along with that, the loss of beautifully established shade trees, the natural umbrellas of our gardens.It is important in the re-establishment of our gardens that we consider the replacement of these essential components of the landscape, and during these winter months many of these trees are available in nurseries.

In making your selection, consideration into the eventual size of the tree must be utmost in your mind. What do you want the tree to provide – summer shade for a particular section of your garden, winter sun or any other reason you might think important. Once the tree has been planted and has started to establish it can detrimental to the tree if you must dig it up and relocate to another location.

There are many trees that can be selected from including : large spreading forms, upright narrow trees for a restricted part of the garden, weeping trees for a central garden position or a range of flowering trees that add a beautiful touch to any spring garden.

Larger spreading trees include Golden Ash, Claret Ash, Manchurian Pear, Gleditsia (several forms) Robinia and Chinese Elm. Upright forms include ornamental Pears (several varieties), ornamental plums (new narrow forms) and many other new varieties that have recently come onto the market. Flowering trees include ornamental Cherries, Crab apples, plums and some magnificent Magnolias.

Most nurseries will now have many of their deciduous trees in stock and, depending on the nursery, the owner would have selected either bare root or container grown forms. With the selection of a bare root tree it is important to ensure that at no stage have the roots been allowed to dry out, as this can cause the tree some difficulty in establishing after it has been planted. Pot grown trees have a more established root system and can be a bit more mature in size and will not have had their roots dry out.

Once your selection has been made the next most important procedure is the planting. If you have selected the bare root form, dig a hole slightly larger than the root size and at least deep enough to cover the roots and no higher than halfway to the graft union. Soak the roots in water and a liquid seaweed base fertiliser and mix some composted animal manure with the soil you have dug out of the hole. Place the tree in at the correct depth and gradually add the soil back into the hole slightly shaking the tree as you go, to allow the soil to fall in amongst the roots. When you have all the soil in the hole slightly compress the soil and water in, to remove any air pockets. Stake if required using two stakes at the side of the plant taking care not to damage the roots.

If you have purchased container grown plants the planting process is the same apart from slightly loosening the roots to allow them to establish. If you are unsure of any of these processes, ask you nursery person.

I previously mentioned in an earlier column that it was important to be patient when making the decision to remove fire affected trees as, depending on the severity of the fires, they might not have been killed but just scorched. I suppose spring will tell as if they don’t shoot, it is obvious they have died. If they are still standing there is hope. If you can reach branches, slightly scrape the bark in a small section and if it is still green, there is still a chance they will recover. If not, remove and start the replacement program.

Good luck!

Keith

#news #winter
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook No Thursday Talk ...

Oops....Howies error. Hope the Winters be kind to you. H.

W

New native plants in the nursery this week include Pimelea rosea ‘Deep Dream’ - a compact shrub (1m x 1m) featuring light green foliage and masses of vibrant pink tubular flowers in spring. We also have new Acacias, Banksias, Conostylis, Grevilleas and Westringias in stock. Keith #nativeplants #news

Thursday July 2nd

New native plants in the nursery this week include Pimelea rosea ‘Deep Dream’ - a compact shrub (1m x 1m) featuring light green foliage and masses of vibrant pink tubular flowers in spring. We also have new Acacias, Banksias, Conostylis, Grevilleas and Westringias in stock. Keith #nativeplants #news ... See MoreSee Less